latinageek

themarysue:

We knew early on that we wanted the new edition to be inclusive: inclusive of beloved material from previous editions, inclusive of different play styles, and inclusive of a varied cast of characters. We also wanted to be welcoming to as many D&D players as possible, to look at the wonderfully diverse group of people who play the game and say, “There’s a place for each of you at the game table.”

A number of RPGs over the years have featured similar inclusivity, and we thought, “
D&D is going to do it too, and is going to do it boldly.”

Dungeons & Dragons lead designer Jeremy Crawford on the thought behind D&D Next's approach to gender and sexuality in character creation. Read the whole interview here. 

gothgirlsgotogivenchy:

Fashion Icon | Fan BingBing

fan bingbing fuckin slays like jesus fuck she is flawless

In the post-World War II era, the Klan experienced a huge resurgence. Its membership was skyrocketing, and its political influence was increasing, so Kennedy went undercover to infiltrate the group. By regularly attending meetings, he became privy to the organization’s secrets. But when he took the information to local authorities, they had little interest in using it. The Klan had become so powerful and intimidating that police were hesitant to build a case against them.

Struggling to make use of his findings, Kennedy approached the writers of the Superman radio serial. It was perfect timing. With the war over and the Nazis no longer a threat, the producers were looking for a new villain for Superman to fight. The KKK was a great fit for the role.

In a 16-episode series titled “Clan of the Fiery Cross,” the writers pitted the Man of Steel against the men in white hoods. As the storyline progressed, the shows exposed many of the KKK’s most guarded secrets. By revealing everything from code words to rituals, the program completely stripped the Klan of its mystique. Within two weeks of the broadcast, KKK recruitment was down to zero. And by 1948, people were showing up to Klan rallies just to mock them.

ceramicsamurai:

"To a young girl, Sailor Moon is a fantasy she didn’t know she wanted; to a woman, it is mental and emotional respite." 

I feel like I just got taken to church. In a good way.

ppaction:

Timeline: 100 Years of Birth Control

Since Planned Parenthood founder Margaret Sanger coined the term “birth control” in 1914, contraception has truly revolutionized women’s lives in the United States, and around the world. Brush up on your birth control history, and see just how far we’ve come in 100 years.

SEE THE HIRES VERSION HERE

livelongandgetiton:

ormondhsacker:

christinefuckingchapel:

is that you hobby lobby

Am I the only one that’s a just a tiny bit pissed off that this is still an issue?

The Original Series wasn’t even in the general VICINITY of fucking around yo

halfbloodcape:

mrpicard:

realdarkmateria:

Party like it’s 2269!



perfection

halfbloodcape:

mrpicard:

realdarkmateria:

Party like it’s 2269!

image

perfection

tomorrowsofyesterday:

So @TheCapitolPN tweeted this
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which was promptly deleted. (G-Bb-A-D are the notes to Rue’s whistle.)

But if you had clicked inspect element before it was deleted

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"You silence our voices, but we are still heard."

HOW COOL IS THIS MARKETING?!?! Like the rebels are hacking into the capitol’s twitter!!!!

(Thanks toastbabeis and mockingjaysource for noticing it and jenliamjosh for reblogging)

sailorp00n:

nofreedomlove:

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Source

"Image Credit: Carol Rossetti

When Brazilian graphic designer Carol Rossetti began posting colorful illustrations of women and their stories to Facebook, she had no idea how popular they would become. 

Thousands of shares throughout the world later, the appeal of Rosetti’s work is clear. Much like the street art phenomenon Stop Telling Women To Smile, Rossetti’s empowering images are the kind you want to post on every street corner, as both a reminder and affirmation of women’s bodily autonomy. 

"It has always bothered me, the world’s attempts to control women’s bodies, behavior and identities," Rossetti told Mic via email. "It’s a kind of oppression so deeply entangled in our culture that most people don’t even see it’s there, and how cruel it can be."

Rossetti’s illustrations touch upon an impressive range of intersectional topics, including LGBTQ identity, body image, ageism, racism, sexism and ableism. Some characters are based on the experiences of friends or her own life, while others draw inspiration from the stories many women have shared across the Internet. 

"I see those situations I portray every day," she wrote. "I lived some of them myself."

Despite quickly garnering thousands of enthusiastic comments and shares on Facebook, the project started as something personal — so personal, in fact, that Rossetti is still figuring out what to call it. For now, the images reside in albums simply titled “WOMEN in english!" or "Mujeres en español!" which is fitting: Rossetti’s illustrations encompass a vast set of experiences that together create a powerful picture of both women’s identity and oppression.

One of the most interesting aspects of the project is the way it has struck such a global chord. Rossetti originally wrote the text of the illustrations in Portuguese, and then worked with an Australian woman to translate them to English. A group of Israeli feminists also took it upon themselves to create versions of the illustrations in Hebrew. Now, more people have reached out to Rossetti through Facebook and offered to translate her work into even more languages. Next on the docket? Spanish, Russian, German and Lithuanian.

It’s an inspiring show of global solidarity, but the message of Rossetti’s art is clear in any language. Above all, her images celebrate being true to oneself, respecting others and questioning what society tells us is acceptable or beautiful.

"I can’t change the world by myself," Rossetti said. "But I’d love to know that my work made people review their privileges and be more open to understanding and respecting one another."

From the site: All images courtesy Carol Rossetti and used with permission. You can find more illustrations, as well as more languages, on her Facebook page.

This is so diverse and positive and wonderful I am in love

Lemon PSA

Lemon PSA

nprbooks:

pickeringtonlibrary:

ridgelibteens:

patrondebris:

pickeringtonlibrary:

We might have mentioned before how much we love science fiction, and the fact that this year’s summer reading theme is Science. Actually: Science!! It needs an exclamation point. 

So, we’ve put together a really, really, incredibly huge booklist (working title? The Hive) for fans of science and fantasy fiction - and we added a little something extra, since, if you’re anything like us, when you love reading a genre, you love to watch films and shows, and play video games, in that same genre. 

And if you’re playing Reading Bingo this summer with us for Summer Reading - or if you’re planning to take part in our Summer Fling (With a Book)! matchmaking program - then these books will definitely see you through summer and beyond!

I like this format a lot.

Totally stealing this for displays in our Teen Center.

Hahaha, steal away!  And add to it!  If we’d had more room, we would have added more books, trust us. :)  

Have we mentioned before how much we love the Pickerington Library? Well, it bears repeating. Also, if you haven’t read READY PLAYER ONE, go do it. RIGHT NOW.

jameshance:

Latest Painting - “Truth, Justice & The Letter ‘S’” (Superman / Super Grover - 18” x 24” Gesso / Graphite / Acrylic / Color Pencil on Canvas)

Yes! One of my favorite things ever, so far! Prints are available right now in my US store and very shortly over in my UK / Rest of the World store

I’ll be framing the original painting and bringing it along to Fanboy Expo, Tampa in September where you can buy it, if you like!

Thanks for your niceness, as always :)

x

My Store / My Facebook / Original Art on eBay

melnjuan:

Star Trek beach towel featuring an Ortiz design, 2014. Available from ThinkGeek . com

melnjuan:

Star Trek beach towel featuring an Ortiz design, 2014. Available from ThinkGeek . com

artattackmusic:

trebrond:

Dr. House in a nutshell

literally every episode of house

artattackmusic:

trebrond:

Dr. House in a nutshell

literally every episode of house