latinageek

youngassoul:

Street harassment w Xena

phrynerobinson:

Thank you for gracing the world with your presence.

phrynerobinson:

Thank you for gracing the world with your presence.

jasonttodd:

DC Bombshells covers

mythicarticulations:

Announcing the original “Chupacabra in a Can”! This poseable Chupacabra skeleton is finally completed and up for sale! You can find it in our Etsy store.

Hey, that’s one town over! I guess it really did kill our chickens.

the-kellephant:

david-tennants-little-fangirl:

image

I still laugh at this every single time I see it.

spoken-not-written:

THIS IS THE GREATEST THING I HAVE EVER SEEN IN MY ENTIRE LIFE

A 110 foot tall Pegasus statue under construction at a Florida casino and race track. It’s slaying a dragon!

Some images from here. More info and images here. Live cam here.

nomalez:

Sandora Ruiz (Art By Sandora) and her comic art.

[FRA] Je l’ai découverte il y a quelques jours car elle avait “liké” certains de mes posts sur instagram. En allant sur son profile j’ai vu qu’elle dessinait quelques toiles. Certaines sont à vendre si ça vous intéresse.

[ENG] I discovered her a few days ago because she liked some of my posts on instagram. By going to her profile I saw that she drew some paintings. Some are for sale if you’re interested.

Follow “Art By Sandora” on the web: Facebook / Instagram .

My Links(follow me): Art / illustration / Marvel / DC Comics .

explore-blog:

Illustrator Gemma Correll reimagines that famous Victorian map of woman’s heart into this map of the introvert’s heart.
Complement with the power of introverts, illustrated.

That Internet Atoll needs to be hella bigger.

explore-blog:

Illustrator Gemma Correll reimagines that famous Victorian map of woman’s heart into this map of the introvert’s heart.

Complement with the power of introverts, illustrated.

That Internet Atoll needs to be hella bigger.

-teesa-:

8.5.14

Now who’s a name dropper, Stephen?

The best.

(via Wonder Bomb | TeeFury)
Japan’s Studio Ghibli Envisages Short Break, not Imminent Closure
Mark SchillingTOKYO — Veteran Studio Ghibli producer Toshio Suzuki discussed the famed animation house’s future in a documentary broadcast by the TBS network on its “Jonetsu Tairiku” program on Sunday evening. Suzuki talked about the need for “big changes in all aspects of our operations.” One possibility he mentioned was a hiatus in the production department and taking what he described as a “short break” to assess the studio’s future. He added that it “would be possible for us to keep making films indefinitely.”Such short breaks are common in the Japanese animation business, in which companies hire animators on a per-project basis and dissolve the production teams, save for a few key staff, when the project is completed.Studio Ghilbi was unusual in retaining a large number of full-time staff by industry standards, with annual personnel expenses totaling nearly $20 million by one estimate. But with the retirement of studio maestro and co-founder Hayao Miyazaki (pictured) in September of last year, Studio Ghilbi lost his fabled box office clout. Its latest feature, Hiromasa Yonebayashi’s “When Marnie Was There,” is expected to finish with about $36 million, which makes it a solid hit, but Miyazaki’s films would routinely top the $100 million mark. His last feature prior to retiring, “The Wind Rises,” finished with nearly $120 million. So as Suzuki noted, the studio has to economize; now that it has become a more normal studio by local standards.A post to an English-language blog subsequently picked up by other media, wrongly reported Suzuki as announcing Studio Ghibli’s closure and dissolution. The death of Japan’s most famous animation house, to paraphrase Mark Twain, has been greatly exaggerated.

Japan’s Studio Ghibli Envisages Short Break, not Imminent Closure

Mark Schilling

TOKYO — Veteran Studio Ghibli producer Toshio Suzuki discussed the famed animation house’s future in a documentary broadcast by the TBS network on its “Jonetsu Tairiku” program on Sunday evening.

Suzuki talked about the need for “big changes in all aspects of our operations.” One possibility he mentioned was a hiatus in the production department and taking what he described as a “short break” to assess the studio’s future.

He added that it “would be possible for us to keep making films indefinitely.”

Such short breaks are common in the Japanese animation business, in which companies hire animators on a per-project basis and dissolve the production teams, save for a few key staff, when the project is completed.

Studio Ghilbi was unusual in retaining a large number of full-time staff by industry standards, with annual personnel expenses totaling nearly $20 million by one estimate.

But with the retirement of studio maestro and co-founder Hayao Miyazaki (pictured) in September of last year, Studio Ghilbi lost his fabled box office clout. Its latest feature, Hiromasa Yonebayashi’s “When Marnie Was There,” is expected to finish with about $36 million, which makes it a solid hit, but Miyazaki’s films would routinely top the $100 million mark. His last feature prior to retiring, “The Wind Rises,” finished with nearly $120 million. So as Suzuki noted, the studio has to economize; now that it has become a more normal studio by local standards.

A post to an English-language blog subsequently picked up by other media, wrongly reported Suzuki as announcing Studio Ghibli’s closure and dissolution. The death of Japan’s most famous animation house, to paraphrase Mark Twain, has been greatly exaggerated.

The Pretty Guardian in a Sailor Suit.

The Pretty Guardians so far.

oh-totoro:

STUDIO GHIBLI ANNOUNCES CLOSURE

Toshio Suzuki has announced the closure of Studio Ghibli. Here’s a translated version of the news article:

"Just moments ago, Toshio Suzuki, Studio Ghibli producer, announced on the TV show of the MBS Jounetsu Tairiku chain effectively as announced as sources close to the studio, Studio Ghibli will close and production studio anime, leaving himself only as a company that will manage its trademarks. As stated in the program’s producer, "the production department of anime will be dismantled," which coincides with the data that we gave in our previous post on this decision had been taken from spring after the poor reception at the box office of Kaguya-hime no Monogatari.

In the interview, Suzuki has also admitted that it was a major setback for the study progress Hayao Miyazaki, one of the reasons already unveiled the portal Rakuten Woman. Once we have access to the full TV interview, adding more data. No doubt that this is a very sad news for Japanese animation, of which we are all fans, because it is undeniable everything Studio Ghibli has given the anime. Please remember that what will be his last film, Omoide no Marnie, premiered at the Japanese box office on 19 July.”